Graduate Study in Computer Science

The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) offers two graduate degree programs in Computer Science and a certificate program in cybersecurity: a traditional Master of Science in Computer Science, a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Computer Science, and a Cybersecurity Graduate Certificate.

Graduate Degree Requirements

All graduate students must take the following courses or their equivalent: CSCI 510, CSCI 551, CSCI 570, CSCI 572 and CSCI 680.

A detailed description of the three graduate degree programs and certificate program in cybersecurity follows.

Traditional Master of Computer Science

The Master of Science in Computer Science (MSCS) program involves (i) 24 credit hours of course work and 6 credit hours of thesis work (for MS in Computer Science with the Thesis Option) or (ii) 33 credit hours of course work and successful completion of comprehensive examinations in at least two graduate courses taken in the student's area of concentration/specialization (for MS in Computer Science with the Non-Thesis Option).

The MSCS program equips students with comprehensive knowledge of contemporary computer science through training that combines both theory and practice. The program provides intensive preparation in the concepts and techniques related to the design, programming, and application of computing systems. The program requires students to take a broad spectrum of courses, while simultaneously allowing for emphasis in desired areas of specialization. The MSCS program offers the following computer science specializations. (The course work must include the courses listed below or their equivalent):

· CSCI 572 Computability & Complexity (3 credits)

· CSCI 570 Advanced Algorithms (3 credits)

· CSCI 551 Advanced Software Engineering (3 credits)

· CSCI 510 Computer Architecture (3 credits)

· CSCI 680 Advanced Operating System (3 credits)

The remaining courses must be selected from the elective options in areas of specialization*.

Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science

Candidates for the Ph.D. program (i) must complete a minimum of 72 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate (BS) degree, of which a minimum of 60 credit hours must be spent in course work and 12 credit hours in dissertation work or (ii) must complete a minimum of 48 credit hours beyond the master’s degree, of which a minimum of 36 credit hours must be spent in course work and 12 credit hours in dissertation work. The 60 credit hours must include the following courses or their equivalent:

· CSCI 572 Computability & Complexity (3 credits)

· CSCI 570 Advanced Algorithms (3 credits)

· CSCI 551 Adv Software Engineering (3 credits)

· CSCI 510 Computer Architecture (3 credits)

· CSCI 680 Advanced Operating System (3 credits)

The remaining credit hours are to be selected from the elective options for the various areas of specialization, in consultation with the student’s advisor and in accordance with individual needs and interests.

Candidates must receive a passing grade on a comprehensive examination and also demonstrate communication skills in English via Expository Writing.

Students with no previous graduate work experience may be required to complete the academic requirements for the master’s program during the first 30 credit hours in the Ph.D. program.

Qualifying Examination

Each doctoral candidate must pass a written and oral qualifying or comprehensive examination, administered and supervised by the department.

Elective Options in *Areas of Specialization

The Computer Science Program offers the following areas of specializations: Software Engineering, Cybersecurity, Artificial Intelligence, Computer Networks, Computing Systems, Computational Science and Computer Science Education. Elective options include the following courses, upon approval of one’s advisor:

· CSCI 552 Advanced Software Engineering II

· CSCI 653 Cybersecurity I

· CSCI 654 Cybersecurity II

· CSCI 659 Capstone in Security

· EECE 676 Cybersecurity for Net CPS/IoT

· CSCI 676 Cybersecurity for Net CPS/IoT

· CSCI 660 Artificial Intelligence

· CSCI 675 Intro to Machine Learning

· CSCI 548 Data Communications

· ECE 487 Telecommunications

· CSCI 634 Advanced Modeling and Simulation

· CSCI 632 Advanced Database Systems

· CSCI 532 Advanced Operations Research

· CSCI 652 Special Topics

Cybersecurity Graduate Certificate

Cybersecurity has become an increasingly important area of study within the discipline of computer science, especially in view of the increased demands for national and international security. The Graduate Certificate in Cybersecurity is designed to provide existing graduate students with a significantly enhanced tool for marketability in the computer security industry.

The interdisciplinary program is comprised of the curriculum in the Computer Science Program. Courses can be used towards the master’s or doctoral degree programs in computer science to provide a continuous path for the student towards a graduate degree. The certificate program requires fifteen (15) credits, including a year-long course in Cybersecurity, two additional technical courses, and a capstone project course.

Fifteen credit hours are as follows:

  • Four core courses (3 credits each):
    • CSCI 653 - Cybersecurity I
    • CSCI 654 - Cybersecurity II
    • EECE/CSCI 676 - Cybersecurity for Net CPS/IoT
    • CSCI 659 – Capstone in Cybersecurity
  • One elective course (3 credits):
    • Special Topics in Cybersecurity
    • Database Systems & Security
    • Wireless Network & Security
    • Advanced Operating Systems & Security
  • Requirements:
    • Demonstration of the same level of achievement as degree seeking students
    • Maintenance of at least a B grade in each course

News

Associate Professor Danda Rawat to Lead Cybersecurity Partnership on $3M NNSA Grant

Tue, March 3, 2020

Howard University is the recipient of a three-year, $3 million grant from the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration, alongside two partnering minority-serving institutions, for The Partnership for Proactive Cybersecurity Training, a cybersecurity research project based on human biological system-enabled machine learning models. Read More >>

Martin Conquers Hackathons with Accessibility Software

Wed, February 12, 2020

Computer Engineering Freshman Devin C. Martin recently conquered at two hackathons: HackHarvard at Harvard University and HackDuke – Code for Good at Duke University. Martin came in third place for Hack Harvard, which had over 400 international participants from across five continents. For HackDuke, Martin placed first among over 300 participants from the nation's top engineering schools, such as the Georgia Institute of Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University, and Yale University. The participants for each hackathon included both undergraduate and graduate students. Read More >>

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